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Norms: What Are They and Why do They Matter?

By: John Bielinski, Ph.D.

The central purpose of a score on any classroom assessment is to convey information about the performance of the student. Parents, educators and students want to know whether the score represents strong performance or is cause for concern. To valuate a score, we need a frame of reference. For example, it is not enough to say Ian earned a score of 64. We need to know how that score compares to expectations. While there are many ways to define expectations, our instinct is to use what we know about the student’s peer group’s performance. The teacher, who knows the performance of the entire class, might recognize that a score of 64 is above average.

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Using Spring Screening Data to Plan Fall Instruction

Universal screening has become a common practice in many schools. This screening involves having all of the students in each grade complete the same assessment. Traditional approaches to universal screening have typically included conducting the assessments three times a year, in the fall, winter and spring. However, research about screening indicates that perhaps it is not necessary to screen all students three times a year, and less frequent screenings can provide enough data about student performance to guide instruction.

This blog will review the purposes of universal screening, explore recent research findings and provide suggestions for alternative screening schedules. A primary focus will be on how to use spring screening data to group students for fall instruction so that those students needing interventions can access them at the very beginning of the new school year.

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Reviewing Annual School and District Data

By: Jessie Kember, Ph.D. End of the year school-wide data can provide educators with insights regarding trends, allowing for reflection while also informing future decisions that benefit the outcomes of all students. Within a problem-solving framework, the final step, plan…

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Comparing Screening and PM Data

By: Jessie Kember, Ph.D. Collecting screening data on three to four occasions throughout the school year, in addition to more frequent progress monitoring, allows educators to evaluate growth that those students involved in intervention have made throughout the school year…

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What if a Student Does Not Respond to Intervention?

By: Rachel Brown, Ph.D., NCSP Many, if not most, efforts to improve student learning outcomes will result in measurable improvements in student performance. Nonetheless, in some cases, a student will not make the growth desired or expected. When this happens, the…

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Using Spring Screening Data to Plan Fall Instruction

By: Rachel Brown, Ph.D., NCSP Universal screening has become a common practice in many schools. This screening involves having all of the students in each grade complete the same assessment. Traditional approaches to universal screening have typically included conducting the assessments…

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